Skip Navigation
Banner

ELA Curriculum Mapping
Grade 11  Semester 2

 

Essential Questions

 

Content

 

Standards

 

Assessment

 

Related Literature & Readings

 

-How does perception alter and shape truth?

-How can conflict and change lead to personal understanding and growth?

-How does our knowledge empower us?

How do author’s communicate and reflect the cultural values of a time period?  How is human behavior influenced by values and beliefs?

-Why is conflict an inevitable aspect of relationships?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Arthur Miller Author Study:

  • The Crucible
  • Death of Salesman (OR)

-The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

-Selections from Prentice Hall text

-Assorted short stories and poetry

Literary Elements for The Crucible:
Setting, Dialogue, Conflict, Plot, Cause and Effect, Irony, Theme, Characterization

Literary Elements for The Great Gatsby:
 Setting, Characterization, Mood & Tone, Symbolism, Figurative Language, Flashback, Conflict, Point of View

Literary Elements for Death of a Salesman:
Flashback, Dialogue, Conflict, Symbolism, Irony, Cause and Effect, Characterization

Writing Skills:
Informational Writing
Expository Writing
Research-report Writing & 
    Analysis
Comparative Writing

Six Traits:
Sentence Fluency, Word Choice, Voice, Organization, Ideas & Conventions

11th Grade GUM Skills

Reading Literature:
11.RL.1
11.RL.2
11.RL 3
11.RL.4
11.RL.6
11.RL.7
11.RL.9
11.RL 10

Reading: Informational Text
11.RIT.1
11.RIT.2
11.RIT.4
11.RIT.5
11.RIT.10

Writing:
11.W.1
11.W.2
11.W.4
11.W.5
11.W.6
11.W.7
11.W.9
11.W10

Speaking & Listening:
11.SL.1
11.SL.3
11.SL.4
11.SL.5

 

Language:
11.L.1
11.L.2
11.L.3
11.L.4
11.L.5
11.L.6

For The Crucible:

Formative:
- Internet based research about social issues of the era or Internet-based research about social issues of the era
-“Jigsaw” activity: Students share research information
- Journals , Cause/effect organizers, Character wheel,
Conflict chart, Plot diagram/story map
-Act  I – IV “act” tests
-“Did You Read” quizzes (homework review quizzes)
-Vocabulary tests
-Reading guide questions (homework)

Summative:
- Historical newspaper
- Scene adaptation and scene performance
- Writing an original epilogue
- Letter writing between characters or character diary

Final Assessment:
Literary/Social Issues Analysis Essay: Exploring Miller’s social criticism through his content

 

For The Great Gatsby:

Formative:
-The Jazz Age research-based Webquest
- Journals , Cause/effect organizers, Character wheel,
Conflict chart, Plot diagram/story map
-Act  I – IV “act” tests
-“Did You Read” quizzes (homework review quizzes)
-Vocabulary tests
-Reading guide questions (homework)
-Note-taking and summarizing
-Chapter charts

Summative:
Oral presentations/Power Point/I Movie/Movie <aker about life and times of the 1920s, including social, economic & political issues

Final Assessment:
Literary Analysis essay exploring the use of literary elements to develop major themes within the novel

 

 

For The Crucible:
-“McCarthyism” from www. sparticus.schoolnet.co.uk

-“Adolescence and Peer Pressure,” by Herbert G. Lingren

-Poetry of Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor

“Sinner in the Hands of an Angry God,” Jonathan Edwards

-“The Minister’s Black Veil, “ by Nathaniel Hawthorne

“The European Witch Hunts, c. 1450-1750 and Witch Hunts Today,” by Adam Jones

History Today’s The Witches of Salem (documentary video)

-Secondary Solutions Common Core Aligned literature Guide for The Crucible

For Death of a Salesman:
‘A Father to his Son,” by Carl Sandburg
-Door to Door, Hallmark Masterpiece film

For The Great Gatsby:
“The Harlem Renaissance: A Cultural Revolution (Prentice Hall text, p. 910-911)
“The Great Gatsby: Primary Sources from the Roaring Twenties” – Library of Congress
http://www.loc.gov/teachers/
classroommaterials/lessons/
gatsbypreparation.html

“Things to Worry About,” Letter from F. Scott Fitzgerald to his daughter, 1933 www.lettersofnote.com/2012/
03/things-to-worry-about. Html

-“Gatsby’s Green Light Beckons a New Set of Strivers,” by Sara Rimer Feb 20, 2008 www.nytimes.com

‘The Great Gatsby Paired Poetry”  http://home.comcast.net/
~renneisen/gatsby_poems.htm

-WWI Poetry – Wilfred Owen, Sasson, Rupert Brook

-Secondary Solutions Common Core Aligned literature Guide for The Great Gatsby